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Eine Kleine Popmusik in Salzburg

sunny 14 °C

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is everywhere in Salzburg, which is not surprising because, in some ways he was the Justin Bieber figure of his day. It has often been said that Mozart was created just to make the rest of us look stupid, (whereas Bieber manages to make us all look brilliant), however there are similarities. Both started very young.
Mozart was composing and performing at the age of five and touring Europe at the age of six, although he didn’t really top the bill in Salzburg until he was appointed Court Musician to the Prince Archbishop when he was seventeen. His holiness lived in gilded digs atop Salzburg’s massive medieval fortress - Hohensalzburg…
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This is a part of his gold studded bedroom ceiling…
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…and he had a cathedral the size of St. Paul’s in the city below…
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But the Arch-skinflint, Count Hieronymus Franz Josef von Colloredo-Mannsfeld, didn’t see why he should pay a tin-pot piano player more than a pittance for entertaining his guests in the court theatre and his regal concert hall in his fortress…
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So, after four years living on peanuts, Mozart became a bad boy. He fell out with the Archbishop and was forced to hit the road. He ended up in Vienna beating out dance numbers for the fashionistas of the day, but he wanted to be taken seriously so he spent most of his spare time writing operas. He soon became a hit and the big bucks started rolling, but it went to his head and he blew all the cash and died penniless at 36. Now if Mozart were around today he, and his agent, would be raking in a fortune in franchise and copyright fees. There are entire stores filled with his brand-name liqueurs, chocolates and perfumes …
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Half of the café’s, restaurants and bars in Salzburg have worked his name into their menus and logos...
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This is the Mozart dessert at the Panorama Restaurant in the fortress…
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And, on any given day, there are more Mozart concerts in Salzburg than a conductor can shake his baton at. But Salzburg has much more to offer than Mozart. In addition to the fortress that dates back a thousand years, (the largest in Europe), there are many splendid buildings more than 400 years old. This is the enormous Mirabell Palace, built in 1606, where the Mozart family performed and where much of the movie version of “The Sound of Music” was filmed…
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The pedestrian friendly streets of Old Salzburg have been walked by thousands of history’s most famous and infamous figures. Kings, queens, princes and emperors have passed this way – and with good reason. Salzburg is a beautiful city that is full of life; of history; and of Mozart.

Posted by Hawkson 01:22 Archived in Austria

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Comments

First again. I get up early. I am learning much more from you than I did in school about history. But then they didnt have computers and cameras that took wonderful pictures. And now you've got the Sound of Music rolling around in my head at 6:am
brr it is cold here. love Jean

by Jean McLaren

I like what you said about franchises. Hope you have been to more fabulous concerts. I am sure by now you must be tired of excellent chocolates and deserts. Have you turned vegan yet?

by Sue Fitzwilson

Amazing how you keep the modern world out of your photos. This time only two cars and a solar panel.
I presume that's a peach floating in the glass.

by R and B

Ahhh, they have the famous Mirabell Schnapps ( fits into suitcase easily) as well as the equally famous Mozart Kugel, Marzipan chocolate, a little harder to transport considering the potential currier.. Eine kleine Gabriola fest ??
Thanks
G

by gottfried

Thanks for the history of Mozart. Glad he was here and left this legacy.

by The Vickerage

Thank you for taking me back to historical and romantic Salzburg. I remember taking a photo of playing a duet on a piano with (stuffy) young Mozart(250-year-old in 2006,though!?!).

by yoshie

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