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New Zealand – Tourism Rules

semi-overcast 22 °C

If it weren’t for the throngs of foreign tourists in buses, R.V.s, campers and rental cars most of New Zealand’s narrow winding roads, (with their ubiquitous single lane bridges), would be left to the great herds of cattle and sheep…
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The tourist spots are busy and throughout our trip we have heard the same cry from hoteliers, “No room at this inn”. Fortunately we had booked all our 16 accommodations well in advance and stayed mainly in motels.
The “Motel” sign in North America screams, “Cheap,” and conjures nightmarish images of nylon sheets on lumpy mattresses; of peeling paint and cracked Formica; of drunks and druggies being hauled away at midnight by the cops. Not here. Here in N.Z. motels have modern, spotless, generously furnished, spacious apartments, each with fully equipped kitchen including dishwasher and washing machine, Jacuzzi bath, super-sized beds and big-screen TVs.

New Zealand has more than its fair share of picturesque scenery like this view of the mountains overlooking Lake Wanaka…
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...and this waterfall on the north island...
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But, despite the number of tourists, there is little money to be made from selling the odd scenic postcard or stuffed toy sheep. So the Kiwis have outdone themselves when it comes to enhancing the rural experience and markets itself as ‘The Adventure Capital of the World.” Guided tramps (that’s a hike to us) and cycle tours are popular, but for those seeking real adventure before dementia, New Zealand offers year-round high octane daredevil activities from bungy jumps and giant swings to swaying treetop walks, cable cars and claustrophobia inducing caving,
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Jet boats, jet skis, kayaks, surfboards, flyboards, sailboards, kiteboards and rafts take thrill seekers on spine-crunching rides on lakes, rivers, rapids, waterfalls and waves, while others float serenely on inner tubes through subterranean streams to view the glow worms. Some are simply content to while away an afternoon just fishing or cruising on a glassy lake…
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Whichever way you view New Zealand, by land, water or on one of the many helicopter and fixed wing sightseeing flights, there is no doubt that it is a beautiful unspoilt country populated by gentle and kind people that is safe, clean, easy and completely familiar for western English speakers. There is absolutely nothing here to frighten Granny. We could easily stay longer but Aussie calls – see you soon in Tassie cobber.

Posted by Hawkson 13:07 Archived in New Zealand

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Comments

I have always heard it was beautiful now I know. Mny thanks.

by sue Fitzwilson

After the first couple of entries, I fully expected to see a photo of Jim and Sheila bungy jumping or cliff climbing. Glad to see that you are sensible and keeping your feet on the ground!

by Joyce

What great weather. Jennifer's group hiking something called the Routeburn track in the pouring rain. This despite severe blisters and loss of toenail. I think I prefer your travels.

by R and B

Glad you enjoyed it. I thought it a wonderful place too. In Wellington an exhibit allows you to simulate an application to immigrate. Even fudging my age wouldn't get me in! Lovely and peaceable kingdom - for a very select few. Your next stop close but not quite NZ.

by Tom

Thanks for all the beautiful reminders of my teenage years spent in NZ. One day I'll make it down there again.

by Kelly Waugh

I like pic of the bat cave! I assume the lady in center is your daughter?
(No way Bob - that's our good friend Christine who is taking a Blissful Adventure with us downunder).

by Bob

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